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What’s Yo Numba? (An Enneagram Introduction Pt. 2)

This Article Will Give You Wings (An Enneagram Introduction Pt. 1)
August 11, 2018
Speed Bumps and Roadblocks: My WordPress Journey
August 18, 2018

Type Descriptions

Much of this is inspired by The Sacred Enneagram by Christopher Heuertz.
This is just a brief description of the types. I highly recommend reading a book to get a more in depth picture of the types.

Heart Types

Type Two

The Helper. The Giver. The Nurturer.

Twos are openhearted, caring, gracious, and generous. They are naturally giving of themselves and very nurturing. Twos often have a fear of rejection in their relationships that stems from their basic fear. Twos can be excellent friends that go to great lengths to take care of and support their loved ones. They are often driven and energetic. They get a lot of things done and strive to do things well (usually as a way to impress others). However, there is a shadow side to their giving at times. The care they provide is sometimes strategic (to earn love through manipulation), even though they are not always aware of this underlying motive.

In disintegration or stress, Twos take on the aggressive and dominating qualities of Eight. However, in integration and growth, prideful, self-deceptive Twos become more self-nurturing and emotionally aware, like healthy Fours.

Basic Fear:

They are not worthy of being loved, are unloveable or are not loved for who they are.

Basic Desire:

To feel loved

Key Motivations:

Want to express their feelings for others, to be appreciated, and to be needed. Twos think, "if I take care of you, you will take care of me."

Childhood Wound:

These children often had an experience early in their life of some crucial need, especially early emotional needs, not being met. As a result, they repress their needs and become overly nurturing of others to gain love.

Vice:

Pride or Self-Abnegation

Virtue:

Humility

Basic Drive:

To win others' approval and love through indirect methods.

Strengths:

Empathic, supportive, motivating, warm, upbeat, friendly, optimistic.

Development:

Accommodating, indirect, angry when unappreciated, overextending, manipulative, take things personally, overindulgence.

Famous Twos:

Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Reagan, Mary Kay Ash (Mary Kay Cosmetics), Richard Simmons, Lionel Richie, Stevie Wonder, Barry Manilow, Dolly Parton, Josh Groban, Paula Abdul, Priscilla Presley, Elizabeth Taylor, Molly Weasley, Dolores Umbridge, Bellatrix Lestrange, & Hagrid (Harry Potter), Samwise Gamgee (The Lord of the Rings), Peeta Mellark (The Hunger Games).

Type Three

The Achiever. The Performer. The Motivator.

Threes are driven achievers and "succeeders". They seem to be able to achieve whatever they desire. At their best, they reflect truth, authenticity, and integrity. Threes live out of a deep pain that results from being disconnected from their own heart. Are they loved for who they are or for what they accomplish? They do not know. Their quietly competitive nature is rooted in their inner drive to prove to themselves that they are valuable.

In disintegration or stress, driven Threes become disengaged and apathetic like a less healthy Nine. However, in integration and growth, vain, deceitful Threes become more cooperative and committed to others, like healthy Sixes.

Basic Fear:

That apart from their accomplishments/image, they are worthless.

Basic Desire:

To feel valuable and worthwhile.

Key Motivations:

Want to be affirmed, to distinguish themselves from others, to be admired, and to impress others.

Childhood Wound:

These children felt rewarded only for what they did and how well they did it. They lost themselves behind the attention they received for their performance. They didn't know where their value came from, so they went in search of validation by attempting to avoid any form of failure. Threes find it hard to accept expressions of unmerited affection or attention. Admiration replaced real love.

Vice:

Deceit

Virtue:

Authenticity

Basic Drive:

To be successful

Strengths:

entrepreneurial, results-oriented, confident, driven.

Development:

competitive, overly focused, abrupt, selectively disclosing.

Famous Threes:

Augustus Caesar, Bill Clinton, Prince William, Condoleeza Rice, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Muhammed Ali, Mitt Romney, Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Oprah Winfrey, Michael Jordan, O.J. Simpson, Tiger Woods, Lance Armstrong, Elvis Presley, Paul McCartney, Madonna, Sting, Whitney Houston, Jon Bon Jovi, Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Brooke Shields, Cindy Crawford, Tom Cruise, Barbra Streisand, Jamie Foxx, Richard Gere, Will Smith, Courteney Cox, Demi Moore, Reese Witherspoon, Anne Hathaway, Ryan Seacrest, Ron Weasley, Draco Malfoy, Professor Lockhart, & Professor Slughorn (Harry Potter), Gaston (Beauty and the Beast), Boromir & Gimli (The Lord of the Rings).

Type Four

The Romantic. The Creative Individualist. The Identity Seeker.

Ironically, Fours see themselves as the most misunderstood and insignificant of all of the types. In reality, Fours are considered the most uniquely fascinating. Fours fear that they are inherently different from others or that they were born without a specific "something" that everyone else possesses. They seem to always be on the search, looking for a rescuer that can profoundly see them. They intensely desire to be known and are unceasingly in search of their significance. The superpower of the Four is their ability to see beauty in all things. Tragically, Fours tend to over-identify with their flaws, wasting their superpower on themselves. Fours are emotionally sensitive, deeply empathetic, very introspective, self-aware and personally expressive.

In disintegration or stress, Fours become over-involved and clinging like a less healthy Two. However, in integration and growth, envious and emotional Fours become more objective and principled, like healthy Ones.

Basic Fear:

That they are inadequate or don't measure up to other people. They fear that they have no identity or personal significance.

Basic Desire:

Want to express themselves and their individuality, to create and surround themselves with beauty, to maintain certain moods and feelings, to withdraw to protect their self-image, and to take care of their emotional needs before attending to anything else.

Key Motivations:

Want to be affirmed, to distinguish themselves from others, to be admired, and to impress others.

Childhood Wound:

Experience of disconnect from their caregivers or feelings of abandonment.

Vice:

Envy (longing)

Virtue:

Equanimity (balance)

Basic Drive:

Isolation vs. Connection

Strengths:

inspiring, introspective, creative, expressive.

Development:

self-conscious, moody, overly sensitive, guilt-ridden, intense.

Famous Fours:

Frédéric Chopin, Pyotr I. Tchaikovsky, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Edgar Allen Poe, Virginia Woolf, Anne Frank, Tennessee Williams, J.D. Salinger, Martha Graham, Hank Williams, Billie Holiday, Judy Garland, Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Cher, Stevie Nicks, Annie Lennox, Prince, Sarah McLachlan, Alanis Morrisette, Feist, Florence ( + the Machine) Welch, Amy Winehouse, Marlon Brando, Kate Winslet, Nicolas Cage, Johnny Depp, Tattoo Artist Kat Von D., Magician Criss Angel, Anne Shirley (Anne of Green Gables), Spike (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), Frodo Baggins & Faramir (The Lord of the Rings), Jay Gatsby (The Great Gatsby).

Head Types

Type Five

The Thinker. The Observer. The Investigator.

Fives are a source of wisdom and knowledge in a world of questions and uncertainty. Perhaps the most withdrawn type in the Enneagram, Fives withdraw as a means of gaining the mental room to understand the world around them and master reality. Fives withdraw and detach from their feelings as a way of finding privacy and freedom in a world that seems intrusive or overwhelming. Fives have analytical minds and spend a lot of time pursuing their intellectual interests. They often possess a great deal of knowledge and expertise in particular areas of study. Fives are usually minimalistic and economical in the things they do, which reflects their concern with making the most of what resources they have and an ability to get by on limited supplies.

In disintegration or stress, Fives become hyperactive and scattered like a less healthy Seven. However, in integration and growth, avaricious, detached Fives become more self-confident and decisive, like healthy Eights.

Basic Fear:

That they are incompetent or don't understand how the world around them works.

Basic Desire:

To be capable and competent and to uncover the essence of truth.

Key Motivations:

Want to be knowledgeable, to understand the environment, to have everything figured out as a way of defending the self from threats from the environment.

Childhood Wound:

These children suffered the loss of boundaries by intrusive caregivers. There is a pain of feeling confused- especially around relationships- and they are often suspicious of most attempts to love and nurture them as emotional distractions that they can't trust.

Vice:

Avarice or stinginess (don't want to give too much externally).

Virtue:

Detachment or nonattachment (letting go of the need to understand everything and resting in the mystery of unknowing).

Basic Drive:

Conservation of resources, especially energy for social interaction.

Strengths:

analytic, objective, rational, systematic, expert, complex interior world.

Development:

detached, autonomous, secretive, aloof, under-emphasize relationships.

Famous Fives:

Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Vincent van Gogh, Georgia O’Keefe, Salvador Dali, Emily Dickinson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Agatha Christie, Stephen King, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Jane Goodall, Kurt Cobain, Thom York (Radiohead), Alfred Hitchcock, Tim Burton, David Lynch, David Fincher, Jodie Foster, John Nash (A Beautiful Mind), Klaus Baudelaire (A Series of Unfortunate Events), Sherlock Holmes (Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle), Smaug (The Hobbit), Elrond (The Lord of the Rings), Beetee Latier & Haymitch Abernathy (The Hunger Games), Severus Snape, Albus Dumbledore, & Arthur Weasley (Harry Potter), Hannibal Lecter (Silence of the Lambs).

Type Six

The Loyalist. The Security Seeker. The Teammate.

Sixes at their best are a source of strength and determination. Sixes doubt themselves, looking to an outside source or authority to confirm what they hope is true. All of this reaching outward to find what they can trust inwardly keeps the Six stuck in a place of anxiety and uncertainty. The Six rests in the middle of the intellectual thinking center, but they are the most disconnected from their thoughts and can be very irrational. Sixes often practice "worst case scenarios," instinctively scanning for danger. Sixes have keen analytical minds and can be remarkably loyal and faithful friends to those they trust. Sixes are unique among the enneagram types because they can present in two very distinct ways. Sixes fear being without support or guidance and they deal with this fear in one of two ways. Phobic sixes are cautious, indecisive, and tend to follow an established authority. Counterphobic sixes rebel against authority and tend to be defiant and reactive. In this way, they resemble and are often mistaken for eights. Sixes often vacillate between phobic and counterphobic behavior.

In disintegration or stress, dutiful Sixes become competitive and arrogant like a less healthy Three. However, in integration and growth, fearful, pessimistic Sixes become more relaxed and optimistic, like healthy Nine.

Basic Fear:

That they will be left without support or are incapable of providing for themselves.

Basic Desire:

To have security and support.

Key Motivations:

Want to have security, to feel supported by others, to have reassurance, to test the attitudes of others toward them, to fight against anxiety and insecurity.

Childhood Wound:

These children felt unsafe in the face of some external threat. In response, young Sixes attached to the protective qualities of their caregivers. As a result, Sixes take on protective instincts- always on the lookout for threats.

Vice:

Fear or anxiety

Virtue:

Courage

Basic Drive:

Survival

Strengths:

loyal, supportive, collaborative, persevering, strategists, problem-solving, good at reading others.

Development:

worrying, analysis paralysis, martyring, tolerance for ambiguity.

Famous Sixes:

Mark Twain, Sigmund Freud, J. Edgar Hoover, Richard Nixon, Robert F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, George H.W. Bush, Diana, Princess of Wales, Prince Harry, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Grisham, Mike Tyson, Bruce Springsteen, U2’s Bono, Melissa Etheridge, Eminem, Oliver Stone, Michael Moore, Spike Lee, Marilyn Monroe, Robert De Niro, Dustin Hoffman, Mark Wahlberg, Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mel Gibson, Sally Field, Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston, Ellen Page, Paul Rudd, Sarah Jessica Parker, Ben Affleck, Hugh Laurie, Katie Holmes, David Letterman, Jay Leno, Ellen Degeneres, Andy Rooney, Katie Couric, Newt Gingrich, Alex Jones (Infowars), Rush Limbaugh, Chris Rock, Bilbo Baggins & Thorin Oakenshield (The Hobbit), Narcissa Malfoy (Harry Potter), Alexei Karenin (Anna Karenina), Logan/Wolverine (X-Men), Hamlet (Hamlet), Carrie White (Carrie), Faith (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), Eleanor Dashwood (Sense and Sensibility), Marilla Cuthbert (Anne of Green Gables), and Tyler Durden (Fight Club).

Type Seven

The Enthusiast. The Adventurer. The Fun Lover.

Sevens are typically the most energetic of all of the types. They are imaginative, charming, and winsome and often come across as feeling heart types. They are perpetually looking for distractions and opportunities to avoid their inner pain.

In disintegration or stress, Sevens become perfectionistic and critical like a less healthy One. However, in integration and growth, gluttonous, scattered Sevens become more focused and fascinated by life, like healthy Fives.

Basic Fear:

Of being trapped in their pain or of being deprived. Sevens experience great anxiety due to a scarcity of options and opportunities.

Basic Desire:

To be satisfied and content and to have their needs fulfilled.

Key Motivations:

Want to maintain their freedom and happiness, to avoid missing out on worthwhile experiences, to keep themselves excited and occupied, and to avoid and discharge pain.

Childhood Wound:

These children felt frustrated that they weren't nurtured enough- always needing more. Sevens take on a self-nurturing posture to cope with their residual pain and frustration.

Vice:

Gluttony (overdo everything pleasurable)

Virtue:

Sobriety

Basic Drive:

Pleasure vs. Pain

Strengths:

Imaginative, enthusiastic, friendly, inquisitive, optimistic.

Development:

impulsive, unfocused, rebellious, pain-avoidant.

Famous Sevens:

Galileo Galilei, W.A. Mozart, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Amelia Earhart, John F. Kennedy, Joe Biden, Sarah Palin, Malcolm Forbes, Richard Branson, Ted Turner, Chuck Berry, Elton John, Mick Jagger, Fergie, Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry, Russell Brand, Sacha Baron Cohen, Steven Spielberg, Fred Astaire, Cary Grant, John Belushi, Joan Rivers, Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Robin Williams, Jim Carrey, Mike Meyers, Bruce Willis, Robert Downey, Jr., James Franco, Leonardo DiCaprio, Charlie Sheen, Cameron Diaz, Paris Hilton, David Duchovny, Larry King, Sirius Black, Fred Weasley, & George Weasley (Harry Potter), Meriadoc Brandybuck & Peregrin Took (The Lord of the Rings), Holly Golightly (Breakfast at Tiffany’s), Lydia Bennet (Pride and Prejudice), Peter Pan (Peter Pan).

Body Types

(also called gut types)

Type Eight

The Challenger. The Leader. The Confronter.

The most driving of all types, Eights are strong, determined, and intimidating. Eights have a fundamental need to be "against." They are against everything, even when they agree, they find a way to push back and fight to size up the trustworthiness of others. Eights can be rude and offensive when trying to get a reaction out of others (sizing them up). Eights are intense. They hate bullies but can be the biggest bullies. They are extremists. They can be hard on themselves and others. Eights hate to be slowed down or cut-off. Deep inside, they know they are using their strength to protect their vulnerable inner child.

In disintegration or stress, self-confident Eights become secretive and fearful like a less healthy Five. However, in integration and growth, lustful, controlling Eights become more open-hearted and caring, like healthy Twos.

Basic Fear:

Of being controlled or harmed by others or not being in control.

Basic Desire:

To protect themselves and be in control of their own life.

Key Motivations:

Want to be self-reliant, to prove their strength and resist weakness, to be important in their world, to dominate the environment, and to stay in control of their situation.

Childhood Wound:

An acceleration of maturity as a result of conflict or harsh environments caused them to feel they need to be strong. Eights often felt smothered by their nurturing caregiver and, not wanting to be controlled by nurturing love, they rejected it and over-identified with the protective stance.

Vice:

Lust (for intensity)

Virtue:

Innocence (awakened through vulnerability)

Basic Drive:

Securing resources

Strengths:

strategic, protective, action-oriented, direct.

Development:

controlling, demanding, disdain weakness, intimidating.

Famous Eights:

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Oskar Schindler, Fidel Castro, Martin Luther King, Jr., Lyndon Johnson, Saddam Hussein, Senator John McCain, Donald Trump, Pablo Picasso, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, Serena Williams, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Queen Latifah, Courtney Love, Jack Black, Chrissie Hynde, Pink, John Wayne, Frank Sinatra, Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis, Sean Connery, Paul Newman, Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Jack Nicholson, Susan Sarandon, Russell Crowe, Sean Penn, Matt Damon, Alec Baldwin, Roseanne Barr, Barbara Walters, Rosie O’Donnell, “Dr. Phil” McGraw, Johanna Mason, President Coin, & President Snow (The Hunger Games), Alastor Moody (Harry Potter), Rhett Butler (Gone with the Wind), Erik/Magneto (X-Men), Sauron (The Lord of the Rings), Othello (Othello), Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland), Jeanine Matthews (Divergent), and Inspector Javert (Les Misérables).

Type Nine

The Peacemaker. The Mediator. The Diplomat.

Nines seek harmony in their external environment and do whatever they can to stay comfortable and at peace. Often they are easygoing, likable, and understanding. They are natural-born mediators because they can often see and understand everyone's opinion. Many times this superpower comes at the cost of their own opinions and desires, however. Maintaining calm and connectedness with others is important. Through "merging" and "blending" with others, nines often take on the habits, hobbies, interests or even emotions of the people in their intimate space. This can also often lead to a loss of personal awareness for the Nine. Nines like to "go with the flow" and try not to "rock the boat." By excessively deferring to others, they can become deaf to their inner voice, feelings, wants, and opinions.

In disintegration or stress, Nines become anxious and worried like a less healthy Six. However, in integration and growth, slothful, self-neglecting Nines become more self-developing and energetic, like healthy Threes.

Basic Fear:

Of separation or that they don't know who they are apart from others.

Basic Desire:

To have stability and "peace of mind."

Key Motivations:

Want to create harmony in their environment, to avoid conflict and tension, to resist whatever would upset or disturb them.

Childhood Wound:

These children were overlooked or neglected and felt unimportant.

Vice:

Sloth or Indifference

Virtue:

Serenity

Basic Drive:

Peace

Strengths:

easygoing, accepting, affable, diplomatic.

Development:

conflict avoidant, unassertive, procrastinating, indecisive.

Famous Nines:

Barack Obama, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Queen Elizabeth II, Claude Monet, J.K. Rowling, Norman Rockwell, Abraham Lincoln, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, George W. Bush, John F. Kennedy, Jr., General Colin Powell, Walter Cronkite, Carl Jung, Carl Rogers, Walt Disney, Jim Henson (Muppets), Tony Bennett, Ringo Starr, Carlos Santana, James Taylor, Janet Jackson, Jack Johnson, George Lucas, Ron Howard, Gary Cooper, Jimmy Stewart, Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, Kevin Costner, Annette Bening, Jeff Bridges, Morgan Freeman, John Goodman, Matthew Broderick, Woody Harrelson, Jason Segel, Lisa Kudrow, Toby McGuire, Zooey Deschanel, “Mister Rogers,” Harry Potter & Remus Lupin (Harry Potter), Dorothy (The Wizard of Oz), Jane Bennet (Pride and Prejudice), Edward Ferrars (Sense and Sensibility), Rue & Prim (The Hunger Games).

Type One

The Reformer. The Improver. The Perfectionist.

Ones are ethical and principled. They elevate the standard of quality and integrity in all things. Ones have a harsh internal critic and strive to be perfect. Inner frustrations often come out as judgmental, but the One's judgments are much harsher inside. Ones are always frustrated with themselves for not doing or being better.

In disintegration or stress, methodical Ones become moody and irrational like a less healthy Four. However, in integration and growth, angry, critical Ones become more spontaneous and joyful, like healthy Sevens.

Basic Fear:

That they are fundamentally corrupt or immoral.

Basic Desire:

To be good and have integrity.

Key Motivations:

Want to be right, to strive higher and improve everything, to be consistent with their idealistic views, to be beyond criticism so as not to be condemned by anyone.

Childhood Wound:

These children felt heavily criticized, punished, or not good enough.

Vice:

Anger or Resentment (exasperated that everything around them and in them is wrong).

Virtue:

Serenity

Basic Drive:

To be incorruptible

Strengths:

Organized, honest, strive for quality, diligent workers.

Development:

Critical, opinionated, impatient, resentful.

Famous Ones:

Confucius, Plato, Joan of Arc, Mahatma Gandhi, Pope John Paul II, Nelson Mandela, Margaret Thatcher, Prince Charles, Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, Jimmy Carter, Michelle Obama, Al Gore, Hilary Clinton, Rudy Giuliani, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, George Bernard Shaw, Thoreau, Dr. Jack Kevorkian, Martha Stewart, George Harrison, Celine Dion, Ralph Nader, Noam Chomsky, Bill Moyers, Jerry Seinfeld, Bill Maher, Tina Fey, Katherine Hepburn, Maggie Smith, Emma Thompson, Julie Andrews, Vanessa Redgrave, Jane Fonda, Meryl Streep, Harrison Ford, Helen Hunt, Hermione Granger, Professor McGonagall, & Percy Weasley (Harry Potter), Atticus Finch (To Kill a Mockingbird), Peter Pevensie (The Chronicles of Narnia), Bruce Wayne (Batman), Buffy Summers (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), Colonel Brandon (Sense and Sensibility), Steve Rogers (Captain America), Ned Stark (Game of Thrones), and Claire Fraser (Outlander).

Tips for Typing

From my personal experience with typing, these are some things you might find helpful.

1. I recommend that you start this journey in your late twenties or early thirties to have the self-awareness needed. If I had "picked my type" in high school, I probably would have chosen the one I wanted to be (or thought was more pleasing). Try to look past the stereotypes that exist within the Enneagram. Not all artists are fours, not all research, book-loving people are fives, not all adventure-lovers are sevens, and not all leaders are eights. Any number can have these qualities.

2. Reflect on your decisions and patterns before the age of 25- when your behaviors were more automatic and less refined by growth.

3. Don't think of yourself in a static state; consider your life as a whole. What are the familiar patterns and emotions? Don't allow "exceptions to the rule" or growth/stress states to cloud your self-reflection.

4. Try reading about and researching the types in depth to determine your number. Tests for the enneagram are not incredibly accurate and may lead you to the wrong conclusion.

5. There are some common "look-alikes" within the enneagram. Try reading about the common mistypings for clarity on how two types are similar and different. For example, look-alikes include (but are not limited to) 4 and 9, 1 and 3, 3 and 8, 1 and 6, 3 and 7, and 7 and 4. These all have numerous similarities, but significant differences (and the list goes on). Don't be embarrassed if you chose a type only to find out later that is not your correct type. There is often a sense of shame tied to your core type- allow yourself to be radically honest. When you encounter your type description for the first time, you may even feel repulsed. Pay attention to that feeling as a clue.

6. Subtype and subtype stacking information can be hugely beneficial when finding your type. Each type has 3 (really 9) subtypes, which adds a distinct quality and explains why people of the same type can seem so different. There is one subtype within each type that is nearly opposite of the standard description; this is called the countertype. Some that are a countertype type have a tough time finding their place in the Enneagram. This post is meant to be an introduction, so I didn't get into subtypes, but if you are puzzled, that is a good next step.

7. Try not to pick the type that you strive to be or are at your best, but the type you truly are. If you feel really proud to announce "your number" to the world, that may be a sign that you have chosen the one you would like to be rather than the one you truly are (not always, but it is a possibility worth considering). As I said earlier, there is often a slight sense of shame or feeling naked when you find your true type. Also, remember, you are not meant to identify with your number forever- it is a starting point. It will be hard and confusing to try to use the enneagram for growth if you are starting from the wrong place.

My Journey of Mistyping

There may be a number that leaps out to you immediately as your own, or it may take months of soul-searching and research to find your type. For me, it has been a long journey of searching. I took a test in the very beginning, which led me to believe that I was a 3 wing 4. Many things about this seemed right, so I stuck with it. There were many things that also didn't fit me, though, too. As I studied more, I thought I could be a 4 wing 3, or a 5 wing 4, or a 1 wing 9, or even a 9 wing 1. I related to many elements of numerous types. As I studied each one, I started to convince myself that maybe that was my true type. I could be almost every number except for 8. 8 and 7 were the only types that I could rule out beyond a shadow of a doubt.

Guess what I found out? This is a common problem for 9s with a 1 wing- which turns out to be my correct type. Nines can find themselves within nearly every number because they are the crown of the Enneagram and contain a little of every number within them. The 9-3-6 triangle on the Enneagram all have some issues with identity-related to the disconnect from their center of intelligence. This helped explain so much to me. I also learned that the two types I was strongly considering (3 and 9) were possibly the least self-aware on the Enneagram. This was shocking. I have always thought of myself as a highly self-aware individual. As I thought more about this, I realized that my definition of "self-aware" was not the actual meaning. I am perceptive, good at reading others, diplomatic, and tactful… but that does not mean that I am self-aware. Even though I am good at reading others and knowing how I am coming across, I do not have a strong sense of self (still hard to admit). Ultimately, I knew that I had to choose between 3 and 9.

I arrived at 9 after considering that I am much too withdrawn and naturally lower energy than a 3- which are considered "human doings" rather than a "human beings" because of their struggle to rest. I have more of a problem getting motivated than slowing down. Also, I am certainly not an assertive person, which is typically a characteristic of 3s. I came to understand that most of the 3 and 4 traits I thought I possessed were better described by 9 and 1. I have a bit of a perfectionist judge inside. If you want a glimpse into my mind, inside my head there is a constant battle between my 9 (feeling unmotivated and low energy) and my 1 (knowing what I should be doing and judging myself for being lazy). It is a constant battle to choose responsibility and movement over sitting and resting. Once I get going, however, you can't stop me, especially if I have committed to a goal. It is a matter of keeping the momentum. My 1 wing is very strong- so strong that I played around with the idea of being a 1 wing 9- but my growth connection to 3 confirmed that 9 is my primary type. Also, 1s probably don't have the "identity issues" of the 9.

Diving into the instinctual subtypes and subtype stacking further confirmed that I am a 9. My primary instinct is one-to-one (sometimes called "sexual") with my secondary instinct being self-preservation. My social instinct is my repressed instinct (which is why I can be awkward, lol). This stacking can have a stronger resemblance to type 4 or type 3, which really helped explain some of my confusion. The instinctual subtypes are truly fascinating and add a lot of information to the types.

This is one of the best descriptions of 9w1 that helped me understand my type.

Another thing that confirmed that I am a 9 was the idea behind this blog. I love my comfort zone, but the 9 often arrives at a point in life where the comfort zone becomes uncomfortable. If that sounds familiar, that is because it was in my very first post, which I wrote before learning about my type on the Enneagram.

After a long time searching, it feels good to have "made it home" and to feel at peace about who I am. I had no idea how lacking in self-awareness I was until this long journey. I am thankful for the language of the Enneagram to help me become more aware and lead me down a practical path of growth.

I hope you have enjoyed my little introduction to the Enneagram. There are a ton of great books and sites about the Enneagram. I will add all of my resources below.

Comment to let me know what you think about the Enneagram! Have you found your type? Do you think that this is a helpful system for personal development?

Resources and further study:

1. The Complete Enneagram: 27 Paths to Greater Self-Knowledge, by Beatrice Chestnut, Ph.D. (2013).

2. The Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of People, by Elizabeth Wagele (1994).

3. The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery, by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile (2016).

4. The Sacred Enneagram: Finding Your Unique Path to Spiritual Growth, by Christopher L. Heuertz (2017).

5. The Wisdom of the Enneagram: The Complete Guide to Psychological and Spiritual Growth for the Nine Personality Types, by Don Richard Riso and Russ Hudson (1999).

6. Typology Podcast with Ian Morgan Cron

https://www.enneagraminstitute.com
http://9types.com
https://www.eclecticenergies.com/enneagram/test
https://oceanmoonshine9.wordpress.com
http://drdaviddaniels.com/relationships-intimacy/enneagram-types-in-relationship/

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